7 Life Changing Lessons Learned From Walt Disney.

Walt Disney
Walt Disney

Walter Elias “Walt” Disney was a film producer, animator, entrepreneur, entertainer, director, screenwriter, voice actor, international icon, and philanthropist.

Walt is well-known for his influence in the entertainment industry during the twentieth century. Walt co-founded Walt Disney Productions with his brother Roy O. Disney and became one of the most famous motion picture producers of all time.

The company that he co-founded is now known as “The Walt Disney Company” and has annual revenues of approximately $35 Billion (US).

Walt and members of his staff created a number of the world’s most famous fictional characters. This includes Mickey Mouse, whose original voice was Walt himself.

Walt has won 26 Academy Awards and he has earned 59 nominations; he has more awards and nominations than any other individual. Additionally, Walt has won seven Emmy Awards, and he is the namesake for Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resort theme parks in the United States, China, Japan, and France.

Clearly there is a ton to learn from Walt Disney. Let’s take a look at 7 Life-Changing Lessons from Walt Disney:

  1. Keep Things in Perspective

    “A man should never neglect his family for business.”

    Your family is your first business, and they should never be neglected in pursuit of “a dream.” Your family must be part of your dream, and should remain within your focus. Never become so consumed in business affairs that you neglect the individuals whom you need most.

  2. Competition is Good

    “I have been up against tough competition all my life. I wouldn’t know how to get along without it.”

    Competition makes you stronger, it makes you better, it keeps you on your toes. Never shrink away from competition; never fail to see the value of competition. Your competitors can provide you with more value than your friends. Learn from the competition, and you will grow.

    It’s critical that you embrace competition as well as adversity, Walt Disney said, “All the adversity I’ve had in my life, all my troubles and obstacles have strengthened me… You may not realize it when it happens, but a kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you.”

  3. Do What You Love

    “Disneyland is a work of love. We didn’t go into Disneyland just with the idea of making money.”

    You must follow your passion, if you’re doing it just for the money, it probably won’t last. Passion is what gives you the strength to overcome the obstacles associated with every dream. Passion is what keeps you going when everyone else is tired…money can’t do that for you, only passion; passion is power.

  4. Do the Impossible

    “It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.”

    Walt Disney said, “If you can dream it, you can do it.” Life is too short to spend it doing the possible. Learn to pursue the impossible, pursue what others say can’t be done, pursue what has never been done before, pursue your dreams, and turn them into a reality.

    You must believe in the beauty of your dreams. Walt said, “When you believe in a thing, believe in it all the way, implicitly and unquestionable.” If you’re going to believe, you might as well believe all the way.

  5. Action Always Trumps Inaction

    “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.”

    I always say that “well done” is better than “well said,” so quit talking and start doing! Quit planning and start practicing; a plan is good, a good plan is even better, but if that plan doesn’t get put into action it’s as useless as a four fingered glove. Learn to get into action, start today, whatever you’ve been postponing …just do it. If you wait for the perfect time, you’ll never accomplish anything.

  6. It Takes a Village

    “You can design and create, and build the most wonderful place in the world. But it takes people to make the dream a reality.”

    Isaiah wrote, “Without a vision, the people perish.” But I think it’s worth noting that without people, the vision will perish. Never forget that you need people; never forget that your life is about serving others. When you serve others, you serve yourself.

  7. Get Better Daily

    “Whenever I go on a ride, I’m always thinking of what’s wrong with the thing and how it can be improved.”

    Everyday you should become a little better than you were the day before. If you can become one percent better daily, you can recreate your life every 100 days. Learn to get better daily; look for ways to improve, to be kinder, more intelligent, and more helpful.

In Closing
Let us remember that Walt Disney said, “All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.”

Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardodavinchi
Leonardodavinchi

Short Biography of Leornardo da Vinci

Leonardo is one the world’s immortal thinkers, artists and philosophers. In several different fields he proved to be both innovative and several centuries ahead of his contemporaries. Born as illegitimate son of a Florentice noble and peasant woman Leornado grew up in Vinci, Italy. In his formative years he developed a love of nature and from an early age displayed his remarkable talents and capacities.

In 1466 he moved to Florence where he entered the workshop of Verrocchio. His early style reflected his teacher, but he soon developed an artistic sense which went far beyond his teachers rigid style. His first work of great significance was the “Adoration of the Magi” commissioned by monks of San Donato a Scopeto. Although unfinished, the work was a masterpiece and introduced several new ideas. In particular he introduced the themes of movement and drama. He also pioneered the use of Chiaroscuro. This is the technique of defining forms through the contrast of light and shadow. This would be later used to great effect in the Mona Lisa.

In 1482 Leonardo went to the court of Ludovico Sforza for 16 years in Milan. Here he continued painting and also branched out into other interest such as engineering and anatomy.  During this period he painted the famous “Madonna on the Rocks” and also “the Last Supper” This has been described as one of the greatest spiritual paintings. With Christ at the centre of the picture it embodies great feeling and action as Christ is about to announce his imminent betrayal. Unfortunately over the time the quality of the original painting has deteriorated despite frequent restoration attempts.

Leonardo Da Vinci and Mona Lisa

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In 1499 his patron L. Sfoza was defeated by the French invasion, thus Leonardo, after a time, returned to Florence. During this period he painted the fresco of the battle of Anghiari. This artwork was to exert tremendous influence over future artists. However it was unfortunately never completed and was later destroyed. It was also in this period that Leonardo completed The Mona Lisa. The Mona Lisa is one of the worlds most famous and intriguing pictures. The Mona Lisa is a portrait of a wife of a Florentine noble. For several days she came to Leonardo and sat for her portrait to be painted. However she refused to smile, Leonardo even tried hiring musicians but to no avail. One day just for a fleeting second she gave a faint smile and Leonardo was able to capture it. Her smile encapsulates a tremendous mysteriousness which is both fascinating and intriguing. Sri Chinmoy said of the Mona Lisa.

That smile has immortalized her, immortalized the artist and immortalized the art. Artist and art have been immortalized by just a faint smile, a smile that has an enigmatic touch. Even now a soul-touch is there, and that soul-touch has conquered the heart of the world.” (1)

In this picture Leonardo masters the techniques of sfumato and chiaroscuro. Sfumato involves the most gradual switch from colour to the other giving a very delicate and expressive images. Chiaroscuro as mentioned before highlights the contrasts light and shadow. In the Mona Lisa this is most evident in the contrast between face and dark background.

In this period Leonardo extended his studies into engineering, science and other subjects. There seemed to be no end to his interest. He made copious notes in his complex mirror handwriting. A lot of which wasn’t deciphered in his lifetime. He also drew complex models of machines, in particular he was fascinated by flight. He used to buy birds just so that he could release them so he could enjoy watching them fly away. He also attempted to build a flying object himself. Machines that he drew on paper, such as helicopters, would become a reality many centuries later. If his medicinal studies had been published, it would have revolutionised the science, as he was one of the first to understand the circulation of blood within the body. There seemed to be no limit in the scope of his interest and work.

Between 1506-1510 Leonardo spent time in Milan working on behalf of the very generous French King Lois XII. In 1513 he travelled to Rome where he enjoyed the patronage of the new Medici pope, Leo X. Here he worked with contemporaries such as the great Masters Michelangelo and Raphael. In 1515 he left to settle at the castle of Cloux, near Amboise by the kind invitation of Francis I of France. Here he spent his last years free to pursue his own studies. He died in 1519 leaving behind one of the greatest body of artistic and scientific works.

Pablo Picasso

Pablo Picasso 1881 – 1973 Painter,

picasso
picasso

Pablo Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain in 1881 to a conventional artistic family. From an early age he displayed great talent for painting and began displaying his work from the age of 14. To further his artistic aspiration he left Spain for Paris where he became part of a new avant-garde movement of art.

His early artistic career went through various states. One of the first states was known as the ‘Blue Period’ In his late teens his paintings were dominated by different shades of blue; they were also often melancholic. This included a famous self portrait where Picasso looked much older than his 20 years.

By 1907, Picasso had developed a new form of painting known as ‘cubism’ This involved capturing the essence of the subject on the canvas but exaggerating certain features; typical of this period is the painting ‘Les Demoiselles d’Avignon’ – it is picture depicting 5 prostitutes in a brother. It is an eye catching and original exploration of modernism in art.

In the 1920s and 30s Picasso concentrated on more classical works of art. He became interested in depicting the human form in the style of neo classical. To some extent he was influenced by artists such as Renoir and Ingres, although he always retained a very unique and individual expression.

Picasso had an instinctive and natural compassion for those exposed to suffering, especially if it was as a result of injustice. His natural sympathy and desire for equality led him to join the French Communist party. During the Spanish civil war he supported the Republicans and nursed a fierce hatred of Franco and what he did to Spain.

Pablo Picasso and Guernica.

One of Picasso’s most famous paintings was his mural of the Guernica bombing. The Guernica bombing was carried out by Italian and German planes and involved the carpet bombing of civil areas. Its objectives seemed not so much military as aiming at destroying civilian resistance and Basque identity.

The bombing of Guernica was a significant development in modern warfare as it showed a  new capacity for extending the horrors of warfare to the civilian population. The bombing became international news through the English journalist George Steer. However, it was the painting by Picasso that helped to immortalise the tradegy as a key event in the twentieth Century.

Picasso was so enraged with Picasso that he never allowed the painting to go to Spain during Franco’s lifetime. It eventually reached Spain in 1981.

The Dove of Peace by Picasso.

picasso dove peace

Another key painting of Picasso was his simple bird drawing a symbol of peace. Picasso donated it the Soviet backed World Peace Congress of 1949. It was rather sad that the Stalinist ideology of Communism betrayed the aspirations of peace loving Socialists like Picasso.

Abundant in artistic inspiration, Picasso enjoyed worldly life to the full. He enjoyed a string of mistresses, good food and wine. He died at the age of 91.

Top 10 Famous Paintings.

1. Mona Lisa – Leonardo Da Vinci

monalisa

Leonardo da Vinci worked on his masterpiece over a period of 20 years. He carried it with him everywhere. The enigmatic smile has captured the imagination of the world. It has been stolen twice and now resides in the Louvre, Paris. When the Mona Lisa visited America in the 1960s, it gained a prominence close to that of the then US president JFK.

2. The Scream – Edvard Munch

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A painting that symbolises the anguish and pain of modern life. It has become one of the most famous pictures of modern times.

3. Creation of Adam – Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo

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Michelangelo took four years to pain the Sistine chapel. He chose scenes from the Old Testament. This is the moment of God creating Adam.

4. Sunflowers – Vincent Van Gogh

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The genius of Vincent Van Gogh is captured in this painting of 12 sunflowers. Has become one of the most recognisable of his works.

5. Ceci N’est pas une Pipe – Rene Margritte

A classic example of modern surrealist art.

6. Poppies in a Field – Claude Monet

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Claude Monet is one of the great impressionist painters. This wonderful pastoral scene captures the essence of how the impressionists captured the beauty and simplicity of nature.

7. The Last Supper – Leonardo Da Vinci

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Leonardo da Vinci paints one of the most famous scenes in the bible – The last Supper. It is after Christ has said one of the disciples will betray him.

8. The Girl With a Pearl Earing – Jan Vermeer

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Jan Vermeer painted this iconic portraits (somewhat reminiscent of the Mona Lisa) and a wonderful example of the Baroque style and the use of light.

9. Le Moulin de la Gallette – Jean Renoir

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A leading impressionist, Auguste Renoir captures the buzz and excitement of this outdoor scene in Paris.

10. Peace – Picasso

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The simplicity of this symbol of peace by Pablo Picasso, remains one of the most powerful pieces of art.

Other contenders for the most famous painting include:

  • Crocefissione (Raffaello Sanzio)
  • Pop art – Andy Warhol
  • The Peristence of Memory – Salvador Dali
  • The Golden Christ – Paul Gauguin

Great Works of Art

Pieta – Michelangelo

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Michelangelo’s Pieta – The magnificent depiction of Mother Mary holding her crucified son, Jesus Christ. Beauty, elegance, restrained yet intense emotion.

Mona Lisa – Leonardo Da Vinci

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The enigmatic smile of Mona Lisa has captured the imagination of the world. The Mona Lisa gives a glimpse of immortality in an anonymous lady.

The Lady With An Ermine – Leonardo Da Vinci

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One of Leonard’s portraits.

David – Michelangelo

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The sublime depiction of the human form. Michelangelo transcended the great classic masters of the past with this flawless sculpture.

Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo

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Michelangelo ‘s four year epic. Unsurpassed scale and greatness that leaves visitors breathless.

Michelangelo Basilique San Pietro in Vincoli

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Rome, Basilique San Pietro in Vincoli, Moïse de Michel Ange

Starry Night – Vincent Van Gogh

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The genius of Vincent Van Gogh is captured in this atmospheric portrayal of French cafe life at night.

Bridge Across the Seine – Van Gogh

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Bridge across the Seine at Asnieres by Vincent Van Gogh

Sunflowers – Vincent Van Gogh

sunflowers

The genius of Vincent Van Gogh is captured in this painting of 12 sunflowers. Has become one of the most recognisable of his works.

Ecstasy of St Therese – Bernini

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The Ecstasy of St Therese – Bernini in Cornaro Chapel.

Water Lillies – Claude Monet

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Claude Monet = is one of the great impressionist painters. Quite a few of his pictures could be chose. But, his Water lily pictures are perhaps the zenith of his artistic impressionism. A wonderful elucidation of light and nature

Haystacks – Monet

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Haystacks by Monet

Soleil Levant – Monet

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Soleil Levant – Monet

Poppies in a Field – Claude Monet

poppies

Claude Monet is one of the great impressionist painters. This wonderful pastoral scene captures the essence of how the impressionists captured the beauty and simplicity of nature.

Inspiration of St Matthew – Caravaggio

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Caravaggio was commisioned to provide three paintings for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of San Luigi dei Francesi. This is one of the three paintings. The other two being the martydom of St Matthew and the calling of St Matthew.

Calling of St Matthew – Caravaggio

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The Taking of Christ – Caravaggio

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The Girl With a Pearl Earing – Jan Vermeer

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Jan Vermeer was relatively unknown in his lifetime. But, this fascinating portrait (somewhat reminiscent of the Mona Lisa) is a wonderful example of the Baroque style.

View of Delft – Jan Vermeer

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View of Delft – Jan Vermeer

Primevera – Botticello

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Primevera (1482) – Botticello –

The Jewish Bride – Rembrandt

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The identity of the Jewish Bride is uncertain. This may have been deliberate on part of the artist, who created a masterpiece of human love that borders on the divine.

Christ in the Storm of the Sea of Galilee – Rembrandt

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Rembrandt captures the drama and emotion of this epic scene from the Gospels. Note his effective use of light and dark to highlight the effect.

The Last Supper – Leonardo Da Vinci

last supper

Leonardo da Vinci paints one of the most famous scenes in the bible – The last Supper. It is after Christ has said one of the disciples will betray him.

Le Moulin de la Gallette – Auguste Renoir

moulin

A leading impressionist, Auguste Renoir captures the buzz and excitement of this outdoor scene in Paris.

By Water – August Renoir

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By Water – August Renoir

Peace – Picasso

peace

The simplicity of this symbol of peace by Pablo Picasso, remains one of the most powerful pieces of art.

The Fighting Temeraire – John Turner

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John Turner, an English Romantic painter, is often referred to as the ‘artist of light’. This scene is a wonderful example of his portrayal of sunlight,

Shipwreck – John Turner

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Shipwreck – John Turner

The Haywain – John Constable

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The Haywain by John Constable

The Cornfield – John Constable

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The Cornfield – John Constable

The Crucifixion – Raphael

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Crocefissione – Raphael

The School of Athens – Raphael

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L’Estaque – Paul Cezanne,

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1883-1885  by Paul Cezanne